The Banff Centre The Banff CentreMountain Culture at The Banff Centre
Amenities migration

Understanding and Managing Amenity-led Migration in Mountain Regions

May 15-19, 2008

Banff, Alberta, Canada

Full conference proceedings are forthcoming in Spring 2009. Conference PowerPoint presentations are available below in PDF format.


Tor Arnesen
Michael Bartoš
Rachel Bland
Axel Borsdorf
Philippe Bourdeau
Gary Buxton
Ron Casey
Paulina Chaverri
Raymond Chipeniuk
Cleo Corbett
John Engen
Viviana Ferrario
Wendy Francis
Dennis Glick
Romella S. Glorioso
Rodrigo González
Jo Ann Groves
Linda Kruger
Claude Marin
Norman McIntyre
Michael McLaughlin
Linda McMillan
Barbara McNicol
Dawn Morrison
Laurence A.G. Moss
Adriana María Otero
Kjell Overvåg
Joe Pavelka
George Penfold
Manfred Perlik
Ray Rasker
Gundars Rudzitis
Khairulmaini Bin Osman Salleh
Jonathan Schechter
Kim Sorvig
Ernst Steinicke

Tor Arnesen

Tor Arnesen holds a masters degree in technology (engineering / industrial biochemistry) and a degree in philosophy from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Currently working at the Eastern Norway Research Institute, he has been doing work on land use policy, environmental policy issues and landscape research, particularly related to recreational use of undeveloped land and development of second home areas / agglomerations. He is presently working on a project titled Recreational homes in the hinterland of urban regions - development and implications, which focuses on how second home development can be seen as an “urban recreational sprawl.” The project aims at a conceptual development to describe an ongoing recreational reconfiguration of rural regions in urban hinterlands.

Michael Bartoš

Michael Bartoš was born in Prague, Czech Republic. He spent part of his childhood in the rural landscape of south-west Bohemia, which influenced his attitude toward the rural lifestyle. After graduating from the Agricultural University in Prague in 1978, Bartos completed his postgraduate studies in landscape protection and management with the Faculty of Forestry in 1981. In 1987, he completed his PhD and is now working at the Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Ceske Budejovice. In 1994, he earned a certificate in technologies for environment protection at the University of Technology, Dresden.

Within the broad field of landscape ecology, Bartoš is mainly interested in the problems of historical land use management, the role of tourism in development of marginal areas, amenity migration, and local socio-economic development. He also teaches Basic Landscape Ecolog” in the Agricultural faculty at the South Bohemian University in Ceske Budejovice and Methods in Landscape Ecology at Charles University in Prague.

Rachel Bland

Rachel Bland is a chartered town planner and currently works as a Planning and Affordable Housing Officer for South Hams District Council in Devon, England. She is lead officer for a number of housing related policy documents and research projects and is also involved in the delivery of affordable housing schemes.

Bland is a presenter for Trevor Roberts Associates, a leading training consultancy for the public sector employees. She presents courses on how to write effective policies, and how Housing Associations can most constructively engage with the planning process. Previously, she has worked as a Community Development Planner at the Lake District National Park Authority, Cumbria, and as a forward planner for Charnwood Borough Council in Leicestershire.

Currently studying part time for her Doctorate in Applied Social Research (Housing) at Stirling University, Scotland, her research looks at ways of delivering affordable housing delivery in areas of high landscape value (national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty) with a particular focus on overcoming the barriers to multi-disciplinary working.

Axel Borsdorf

Axel Borsdorf is a professor in the Department for Geography at the University of Innsbruck and head of the department for Mountain Research: Man and Environment of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. He is a full member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vice President of the Austrian Institute for Latin America, Vice President of the Austrian National Committee for the International Geographical Union and co-editor of several scientific journals (Die ERDE, investigaciones, attención, Norte Grande, Peripherie, Historische Sozialkunde: Internationale Entwicklung, Bentham Open Access Journal on Geography and others). Borsdorf is a Member of the Academic Board of the Humboldt Society, the International Scientific Committee on Alpine Research, the National Committees on Alpine Research and the Man and Biosphere Programme.

Philippe Bourdeau

Philippe Bourdeau is a professor at the Institute of Alpine Geography at the University J. Fourier in Grenoble, France. He conducts research on the cultural geography of mountain tourism and outdoor sports and has a special interest in “tourist utopias”, crises in the tourism industry, criticisms of the tourism industry, and post-tourism phenomena.

Bourdeau represents France on the International Scientific Committee on Alpine Research (ISCAR) and is one of the leaders of French network www.sportsnature.org which is a network for researchers and experts in mountain and nature-based sports.

Gary Buxton

Gary Buxton graduated from the Environmental Design Faculty at the University of Calgary in 1994 with a focus on urban design. He worked with the Palliser Regional Planning Commission from 1994 to 1997 and as manager with the Town of Brooks from 1997 to 1998, and moved to the Town of Canmore in 1998 to work as a development planner. In his current position as Senior Manager of Planning, Buxton deals with many unique conditions the community faces, from rapid growth, sustainability initiatives, community consultation, infrastructure planning, environmental and wildlife corridor issues to major resort planning and affordable housing concerns.

Recently, much of Buxton’s professional time has been spent examining resort development experiences from similar communities in western Canada and U.S., and attempting to provide leading edge policy advice to Council. Working in a small community planning department affords him the opportunity to be exposed to many different issues that may not apply larger municipalities.

Ron Casey

Ron Casey

Ron Casey has lived in Canmore, Alberta, for more than 30 years. He was elected to Town Council in October 1995 and Mayor of Canmore from 1998 to 2001. After a three year break, he was re-elected Mayor in 2004 and again in 2007. Mayor Casey has served as a member of numerous local and regional boards and committees including the Municipal Planning Commission, Subdivision and Development Appeal Board, Economic Development Committee, Environmental Advisory Review Committee, Chamber of Commerce, Alberta Urban Municipalities Environment Committee, AUMA Housing Task Force, Bow Valley Regional Waste Commission, Calgary Olympic Development Association (CODA), Biosphere Institute of the Bow Valley, Calgary Regional Partnership Executive Committee, Canmore Economic Development Authority (CEDA), Bow Valley Regional Housing, and others.

Paulina Chaverri

Paulina Chaverri is an independent consultant in the field of sustainable environment. She has been an advocate and facilitator for participatory planning process for the last 20 years, working mostly with non-governmental organizations and networks. Chaverri holds a Master’s Degree in Community and Regional Planning from the University of New Mexico and has taught as an Associate Professor in the Risk Prevention and Disaster Management Graduate Program of the University of Costa Rica. She has worked on foreign cooperation programs, environmental education curriculum design, and in community capacity building. Disaster recovery and prevention has been a focus for Chaverri. She has researched these topics throughout Central America, worked on disaster prevention projects addressing education and people’s organization topics in Caracas, Venezuela, and was in charge of a community-based monitoring and early warning system in Bogotá, Columbia. Most recently, she has researched rural development, gender and participatory zoning plans in Costa Rica.

Raymond Chipeniuk

Raymond Chipeniuk

Alberta native Raymond Chipeniuk has completed two degrees in English language and literature. He spent two years in Nigeria volunteering for CUSO (Canadian University Service Overseas), has worked as a reporter and editor for small rural newspapers in Canada, was a research assistant in the House of Commons, an editor in the House of Commons Committee Reporting Service, and is an avid mountaineer and paddler. Along the way, Dr. Chipeniuk also acquired a M.Pl. in Urban and Regional Planning, and a Ph.D. in Regional Planning and Resource Development. After completing his M.Pl. and Ph.D. Dr. Chipeniuk and his wife became amenity-migrants and moved to Smithers, British Columbia.

Dr. Chipeniuk has published about 20 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters reporting his research in regional planning, resource planning, park planning, planning for amenity migration, and other fields. He has also published many articles and book chapters intended for the general reader. At present he is consulting in municipal planning in northern British Columbia. He is also an adjunct professor at the School of Environmental Planning at the University of Northern British Columbia.

Cleo Corbett

Cleo Corbett

Cleo Corbett is a dynamic speaker whose passion for protecting and enhancing BC’s emerging resort communities while facilitating orderly growth and development is demonstrated through her presentations and actions. Her use of innovative ways of engaging the community in planning matters and visioning for a preferred future exemplify her respect for a community’s sense of place and unique history.

A bachelor’s degree in Tourism and Recreation Management provides an effective backdrop for Corbett’s on-the-ground experience in fast growing communities such as Tofino, Ucluelet, and Golden, BC, where she is currently the manager of Development Services. Cleo has worked with, and was mentored by, Felice Mazzoni of Ucluelet and assisted in creating the nationally and internationally acclaimed Ucluelet Official Community Plan, which is recognized for sustainability in planning. Corbett is currently pursuing a certificate in Urban Design from Simon Fraser University and full membership in the Planning Institute of BC and Canadian Institute of Planners. Having just completed a rewrite of Golden’s Official Community Plan, Corbett is looking forward to implementing the plan and pushing the boundaries of sustainable development using a multilevel bottom line approach.

John Engen

John Engen

John Engen became the 50 mayor of Missoula, Montana (USA), in 2006 after serving a four-year term as a City Councillor. Before entering public service, Engen worked for 15 years in the newspaper business in his hometown of Missoula, Montana. An award-winning writer and editor, Engen’s newspaper career began at 17 when he was invited to write a humour column for The Missoulian. He has managed a media division for a Montana retail chain and most recently operated his own advertising, public relations, and publishing company, Engen Creative. Engen has served on a number of volunteer boards and is past president of the Missoula Downtown Association, Young Audiences of Western Montana, and the Missoula Food Bank boards. Engen graduated from Hellgate High School and the University of Montana, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism.

Viviana Ferrario

Viviana Ferrario graduated from the Architecture program at the IUAV University of Venice in 1996. After completing a masters in Architecture and Sustainable Development at EPFL - Ecole Polytechnique of Lausanne in 1999, she obtained a PhD in Urbanism from the IUAV University of Venice. Alongside her professional activity she collaborates in researches for the Department of Urbanism at IUAV University and for the Department of Geography at the University of Padua. Her main interests lie in historical and recent landscape transformations in rural-urban and mountain areas, with particular regard to the relationships between landscape and urbanism. She is a consultant for the Veneto Region Planning Department.

Wendy Francis

Wendy Francis is Yellowstone to Yukon’s (Y2Y) senior conservation program manager, having joined the staff in September 2007. She has been involved with Y2Y since its inception, as a volunteer, board member, and contract staff. In her current role, Francis is responsible for Y2Y’s conservation interests in the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks and northwards into northeast British Columbia, ensuring that aboriginal organizations and communities are integrated into Y2Y’s work, and for strengthening communications with Y2Y’s many partners. Educated in law and biology, Francis has a wide range of skills, including organizational leadership, management and administration, conservation campaign design and delivery, facilitation and consensus-building, communications and outreach, and research and writing. She has held positions as director of conservation and science at Ontario Nature, interim executive director at the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, conservation director for CPAWS Calgary-Banff. She has five years of law practice, over two years as senior associate with Western Environmental and Social Trends Inc., and seven years as the owner of her own conservation consulting business.

Dennis Glick

Dennis Glick is the director of the Northern Rockies Office of the Sonoran Institute and manages the Institute’s programs in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Glick has worked for many years in the Greater Yellowstone region pioneering community-based conservation and growth management efforts. Before moving to the Northern Rockies he served as the co-director of the Wildlands and Human Needs Program of the World Wildlife Fund, and has been a leader in developing community-based conservation practices both nationally and internationally.

Romella S. Glorioso

Dr. Glorioso focuses her research and practice on sustaining the quality of life of smaller human communities in healthy ecological systems, especially in mountain regions. To these issues and opportunities she brings an integrated multidisciplinary approach grounded in her education and experience, along with substantial global experience. She is Associate Director of the International Amenity Migration Centre, (Spokane, USA), and a Research Fellow at the Institute of Systems Biology & Ecology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Ceske Budejovice, CZ).

Initially educated in the Philippines (B.Sc. geology, urban & regional planning), she undertook graduate studies in Thailand (M. Sc. environmental resources planning & management), Czech Republic (Ph.D. landscape ecology) and USA (GIS). Dr. Glorioso has considerable experience and achievement as an environmental change analyst and planner, emphasizing strategic and bioregional perspective and methods. She has worked at: natural resource and environmental analysis and planning, including EIA and RRA (Czech Republic, Philippines, Thailand, USA); local and regional development analysis and sustainable community planning (Czech Republic, Philippines, USA); agrarian reform and agricultural extension services and facilities (Philippines); engineering geology, including natural hazard preparedness (Philippines); and amenity-based change analysis and policy formulation and implementation (Canada, Czech Republic, Philippines, Thailand, Viet Nam, USA).

Rodrigo González

Rodrigo González

Rodrigo Cristián González has a degree in Tourism from Universidad Nacional del Comahue and a masters degree in Environmental Impact Assessments from the Instituto de Investigaciones Ecológicas. He is a professor in the field of Tourism Economics at the Universidad Nacional del Comahue in Argentine, teaching courses at both a graduate and post graduate level. He was a research fellow from 1994 to 2000 at Universidad Nacional del Comahue and is currently a researcher at CEPLADES Tourism - Tourism Sustainable Development and Planning Study Centre.

Gonzalez has also worked as a consultant in the field of tourism and recreation, projects formulation and evaluation, tourism products design, and tourism destinations competitiveness. Among other grantships, he was a fellow with the Indian Technical and Economical Cooperation Program, for the International Training Program on Entrepreneurship and Small Business Promotion, held at Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India, Ahmedabad, India.

Jo Ann Groves

Jo Ann Groves

Jo Ann Groves is a Councillor of the Town of Smithers, BC. Groves first served as a Councillor and Finance Chair for the Town of Smithers for one term from 1999-2002. Groves was re-elected in 2005 and is now serving her 2nd term. She is currently Chair of the Finance Committee, Chair of the Economic Development Committee and Chair of the Spirit of BC Committee. Groves is also Council liaison to the Chamber of Commerce Committee.

As the Chair of the Economic Development Committee, Groves has been instrumental in acquiring British Columbia Real Estate Foundation funds to undertake a comprehensive study of Smithers (“Boom Town to Sustainable Town”) to determine how the Town of Smithers can benefit from large-scale industrial development projects as well as possible ski hill expansion plans, while retaining its small town character and the many amenities that attract people to Smithers as a community of choice.

Linda Kruger

Linda Kruger is a research social scientist with the United States Forest Service - Alaska Communities and Forest Environments Team in Juneau, Alaska. Kruger performs research that is focused on community capacity and resilience; the special connections people have with places on the landscape; and the interactions among population dynamics, tourism, recreation, and traditional and rural cultures. Ultimately, her research helps managers better understand what the public thinks about and expects from forest management and why, for example, they recreate in certain places.

Kruger has a PhD in forest resources and social sciences from the University of Washington and a masters degree in Whole Systems Design from Antioch University. She is a member of the Society for Applied Anthropology, the International Association for Society and Natural Resources and the Society for Human Ecology.

Claude Marin

 

Claude Marin is the director of Cultural Affairs for the town of Chamonix, France. As the cultural director, Marin is involved with exhibitions, museums, festivals, the local library, as well as sports, science, and cultural events. Marin studied business and communication in university and went on to become a certified ski instructor and mountain guide. He founded and managed two mountain sports shops and was the director of the Syndicat National des Guides de France for six years.

Claude Marin is excited to return to Banff – a town he is familiar with after working as a helisking guide with Canadian Mountain Holidays in 1975.

Norman McIntyre

Norman McIntyre

Norm McIntyre studies 'cottage life' and particularly the influence of multiple dwelling on people's concepts of home, identity, and place. This work has resulted in a number of publications, special reports, and a book (McIntyre, Williams & McHugh, 2006). He is also an expert in the study of forest recreational values and how these may be included in the management planning process in commercial forests. This research has involved the application of a number of different data collection methods, including focus groups with forest communities, recreational diaries, and web-based GIS surveys.

Michael McLaughlin

Micheal McLaughlin earned a bachelor of science in Forestry and Economics from Lakehead University in 1977 and a doctorate in Cross-cultural Studies from the University of Toronto in 1995. In 1998, Dr. McLaughlin left academia and moved to British Columbia where he established Rural Futures, an association of professionals that specializes in rural community development. Rural Futures has been a pioneer in social forestry, conservation based economic development, the “people economy”, and sustainable tourism. Recently, Dr. McLaughlin led his team in the development of services that assist rural communities to deal with the uncertainties of global energy supply and climate change mitigation.

Dr. McLaughlin is Chair of the Chinook Institute for Community Stewardship (Canmore, AB), a recognized leader in community stewardship of landscapes.

Linda McMillan

As a long-time leader in the American Alpine Club, Linda McMillan (MBA) has spent a decade making climbers and other recreationists part of the solution to protected area management. Her success in creating stewards of parks and wild lands is well recognized, and her experience as a business consultant has helped her to combine the interests of protected area users, land managers, and gateway communities.

Internationally, McMillan is deputy vice chair of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) Mountains Biome, a member of the WCPA Task Force for Cities and Protected Areas, and a member of the Access and Conservation Commission of the International Mountaineering and Climbing Federation (UIAA). She has contributed chapters to a number of books about planning and management in mountains, particularly in protected areas. McMillan is also a leader of the IUCN-UIAA Protected Areas Melting Glaciers Project, which uses compelling “live reports” from climbers and mountaineers around the world to raise awareness about current and potentially catastrophic future impacts of climate change on mountain protected areas.

Barbara McNicol

Barbara McNicol is a social environmental geographer with research and teaching interests in parks and protected areas, environmental management, and tourism concerns. Dr. McNicol is a geography instructor and Xhair of the Earth Sciences Department in the Faculty of Science and Technology, Mount Royal College, and adjunct assistant professor in the Geography Department, Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Calgary.

Dawn Morrison

In the years away from her ancestral Secwepemc (Shuswap) community, Dawn Morrison’s work in various capacities throughout her 20 year career in Horticulture has literally kept her in touch with her Indigenous roots through applying an ecological approach to studying and working with plants. Her Secwepemc heritage, along with her technical and practical background in horticulture and ethonobotany, as well as her passion for environmental and cultural revitalization, lead her to a long lasting career in Aboriginal adult education and community self-development.

Morrison returned home in 2000 to re-connect with her ancestral ties in Secwepemc territory and has since committed to learning and working with Elders and traditional hunters, fishers, and harvesters to improve the health and well being of the Secwepemc peoples, the land they have traditionally lived on, and their language and way of life. As a community self-development facilitator, Morrision works from a basis of Indigenous food sovereignty and eco-cultural restoration and has an educational background in the areas of horticulture, adult instruction, restoration of natural systems, and business management.

Some of Morrison’s most recent professional developments include participating in various roles with several indigenous and non-indigenous organizations including the newly designated B.C. Food Systems Network - Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty (Coordinator/Director), 1st Annual Interior of B.C. Indigenous Food Sovereignty Conference (Coordinator), Around the Kitchen Table Project – Aboriginal Women’s Group working on HIV/AIDS Awareness and Prevention (Community Facilitator), and Project Associate on various other land, culture and ecology related projects.

Laurence A.G. Moss

Laurence A.G. Moss focuses on regional and local change and sustainable development analysis, planning and institutional capacity development, along with strategy, policy and project monitoring and evaluation. For the past 15 years he has targeted cultural and environmental sustainability issues in mountain regions, particularly the effects of amenity-led change and related global forces, such water, energy and urbanization dynamics. An interdisciplinary and ecological approach is essential to his practice, as is the use of strategic analysis and collaborative methods. He is an innovator in both theory and practice in these areas, especially the opportunities and threats of amenity migration and urbanization in fragile ecological zones. Laurence Moss works principally through the International Amenity Migration Centre, which he and his wife, Dr. Romella S. Glorioso, established in 2003.

Dr. Moss has worked in some 25 countries for local communities and regional and national bodies, and through a number of international organizations. He has also taught and undertaken research at universities and other research institutions and advised art & culture and community development entities. He is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Systems Biology & Ecology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, a member of the International Advisory Board at the Mingei International Museum (San Diego, USA) and a member of the Board of Directors for the Chinook Institute for Community Stewardship (Canmore, Canada).

Adriana María Otero

Adriana María Otero is currently an adjunct professor within the Tourism Faculty at Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén, Argentina. She has a Ph.D. in Human Geography, a bachelor in Environmental Planning, and a degree in Tourism. Born in Morón, Buenos Aires, at 18 she moved to Patagonia to study, and settled there. After completing two degrees in Tourism and Environmental Planning, Dr. Otero has been part of different tourism planning working groups in Patagonia. She has been especially devoted to public use issues in National Parks. During the nineties she worked as tourism planning consultant for Argentina Cooperation in Guatemala in three different missions.

Research at Comahue University has been her passion, and the effort has been to develop tourism as a field of study in a public University. She has been research secretary of the Tourism Faculty for two terms. Two years ago, Dr. Otero succeeded in creating a research centre, within the Tourism Faculty, devoted to tourism planning and sustainable development. Dr. Otero has published about thirty peer-review articles and book chapters reporting her research in tourism planning, park planning, nature base tourism, and amenity migration.

Kjell Overvåg

Kjell Overvåg

Kjell Overvåg earned a masters degree in human geography from the University of Oslo in 2000, and a diploma in tourism from Lillehammer University College in 1992. Currently, Overvåg works with the Eastern Norway Research Institute. Since 2006, he has been a PhD-candidate with a project called "Recreational homes in the hinterland of urban regions - development and implications". The project, funded by the Research Council of Norway, focuses on how second home development influences rural areas, especially regarding land use and planning. His research interests include general tourism development, regional analysis, and planning. Earlier work experiences consist of regional and local government community planning and industrial development, an advisor within tourism development, and as an associate professor in human geography at Lillehammer University College.

Joe Pavelka

Joe Pavelka has been dedicated to understanding the role of leisure in the everyday lives of North Americans for over 15 years. He has pursued this understanding as a college and university educator, researcher, speaker, consultant, writer and practitioner in the field. Pavelka has a Master's degree in Recreation Administration, undergraduate degrees in Outdoor Recreation and Geography, and is currently completing his doctorate in Geography at the University of Calgary, studying amenity-led migration and community change. He is also a full time faculty member at Mount Royal College, teaching in the area of Ecotourism and Outdoor Leadership. He has worked with The City of Calgary Parks and Recreation in a variety of capacities, and also teaches courses in marketing, leisure and tourism management at the University of Calgary. He is also a member of various boards including the Karelian Bear Dog Shepherding Institute of Canmore. In 1990, Pavelka founded Planvision Consulting Limited through which he provides training, business planning, public consultation and market research services to numerous public, commercial and not-for-profit organizations across Canada, mainly in the areas of parks, recreation and tourism. He has recently published a children’s book, Ned: The Story of Bear Six,Nine, Three, a story about a bear struggling with human encroachment on his habitat.

George Penfold

George Penfold is Regional Innovation Chair in Rural Economic Development at Selkirk College in Castlegar, B.C. and Adjunct Professor at the School and Business and Economics at Thompson Rivers University. Penfold has worked for provincial and local governments, and was a faculty member at the University School or Rural Planning and Development at the University of Guelph for 14 years. Prior to joining Selkirk College in 2006, he was a community planning and development consultant on Vancouver Island working with private landowners, community organizations, local, regional and provincial governments and First Nations communities. In addition to his professional activities, he has also owned and managed a small farm in Ontario and a marine eco tourism business in B.C. George is on the Board of the Canadian Rural Revitalization Foundation, and co-chair of a research committee of the BC Alberta Alliance of the Canada wide Social Economy Project.

Manfred Perlik

Manfred Perlik is a senior researcher with the Institute for Spatial and Landscape Planning (IRL) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He wrote his doctoral thesis on urbanisation processes in the European Alps, and has considerable experience studying with demographic and structural changes in the European Alps. He conceived and prepared the International Conference "Future of the Towns in the Alps in Europe", Villach, Austria (1998) and edited the proceedings. The conference was organized in the framework of the event "Villach – Town of the Alps” 1997, for which Manfred Perlik was a scientific consultant. Dr. Perlik has a Ph.D. in Economic Geography and Regional Research and a diploma of geography with a special focus on alpine hydrology.

Ray Rasker

Ray Rasker is the executive director of Headwaters Economics, an independent, nonprofit research group that strives to improve community development and land management decisions in the West. Dr. Rasker has written extensively on wildlife economics, rural development, and the interaction between environmental quality and economic prosperity. In his former position as senior economist for the Sonoran Institute, Dr. Rasker was the lead author of Prosperity in the 21st Century West: The Role of Protected Public Lands. Ray’s current work includes assessments of benefits and costs stemming from different development decisions, including comparisons of impacts from amenity-driven migration versus resource development in rural communities. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the College of Forestry, Oregon State University, a masters in Agriculture from Colorado State University, and Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Biology from the University of Washington. Dr. Rasker also holds an affiliate position at Montana State University in the Department of Ecology.

Gundars Rudzitis

Gundars Rudzitis

Gundars Rudzitis is a professor of geography at the University of Idaho. He has also taught at the University of Texas and been a visiting professor at Boston University, Clark University, Harvard University, and the University of New Mexico. He does research in the area of amenity migration and regional development, quality-of-life and development theory, environmental and resource policy with a focus on wilderness and public lands in the American West. He is the author of several books, including Wilderness and the Changing American West, (John Wiley and Sons) and his forthcoming, The Ongoing Transformation of the American West (University of Chicago Press), as well as chapters on topics ranging from where the rural rich live, and why it matters; the ongoing demographic, social, and cultural changes taking place in the American West; and the environmental, resource, and sovereignty conflicts taking place on Indian reservations in the American Northwest. He also spends time, whenever he can, hiking on the wild and public lands in the region.

Khairulmaini Bin Osman Salleh

Khairulmaini Bin Osman Salleh

Khairulmaini Osman Salleh is a professor of Physical Geography at the University of Malaya in Malaysia. Dr. Khairulmaini pursued postgraduate studies at the University of Sheffield and completed PhD research on semi-arid erosional systems in SE Spain funded by UNESCO and the University of Sheffield. His research interests are in Fluvial Geomorphology (River Basin Studies), Natural Resources, Environmental Hazards, Disturbed Geomorphological Systems, Local and Regional Environmental Security, and issues of societal vulnerability to the climate change threats. He is currently researching the vulnerability and adaptive capacities of low income economic systems for the highland, urban, and coastal / island regions of Peninsular Malaysia. In 2007, he undertook a special project studying the impact of highland tourism on indigenous societies social rubric and practices. Dr. Khairulmaini is also helping to set up the University of Malaya's Climate Affairs Center (UMCCA). UMCCA networks and collaborates with foreign agencies to promote research and awareness in climate affairs especially "early warning systems".

On a personal note, Dr. Khairulmaini, is married to a lovely wife and has four wonderful children. His wife is Professor Dr Fauza Ab Ghaffar, lecturer in Urban Planning and Regional Development Studies and Head of University of Malaya's Quality Assurance Unit (QAMU).

Jonathan Schechter

Jonathan Schechter

Jonathan Schechter is founder and executive director of the Charture Institute, a Jackson, Wyoming-based non-profit research organization. Founded in 2001, Charture focuses on the growth and change occurring in resorts, national park gateways, and other communities located in beautiful surroundings. Charture studies, writes, and helps teach such communities how and why they are changing, and what they can do about it. To fund sustainability efforts in these communities, in 2006 Charture started 1% for the Tetons. Member businesses donate one percent of their sales to 1%, which aggregates the funds and grants them to local non-profits. In its first year, 1% enrolled over 50 member businesses, and granted out over $100,000 to sustainability projects in the Tetons region.

For over a decade, Mr. Schechter has written a bi-weakly economics column for the Jackson Hole News & Guide. Mr. Schechter was twice elected to the governing board of St. John's Medical Center in Jackson Hole, and currently serves as an officer of two Jackson-based organizations he helped found: Conservation Ink and the Jackson Hole Center for Global Affairs. He received his master’s degree in Public and Private Management from Yale University, and his bachelor’s degree in Human Biology from Stanford University.

Kim Sorvig

Kim Sorvig

Kim Sorvig is a nationally and internationally respected expert on landscape applications of ecology and sustainable design.  His book, Sustainable Landscape Construction: A Guide to Green Building Outdoors, is a standard textbook in many universities in the English-speaking world, as well as Germany, Japan, and China.  He was a consultant to the US Green Building Council on landscape issues in developing the first set of LEED criteria. He has published over 50 reviews and evaluations of sustainability-driven and interpretive landscape projects.  His two articles exposing unintended consequences of vegetation clearing for fire prevention won the American Society of Landscape Architects Bradford Williams Medal.

Ernst Steinicke

Ernst Steinicke (PhD) is a professor at the Institute of Geography at the University of Innsbruck, Austria since 1997 and an invited lecturer at the University of Vienna. Steinicke was a Fulbright research fellow at the University of California. He has been a leader in many projects, including counter-urbanization in the High Sierra Nevada with the Austrian Science Fund (FWF). He is currently conducting research on Pozuzo – Maintenance and Evanescence of German Ethnicity in Eastern Peru. Steinicke has published work on population research, minority research, regional planning, regional geography, land price research, counter-urbanization, and amenity migration.

Understanding and Managing Amenity-led Migration in Mountain Regions is a project of Mountain Culture at The Banff Centre, in partnership with the International Amenity Migration Centre (IAMC).

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