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Reel Time Film Series

Reel Time features some of the best films from the Toronto International Film Festival. The series brings alternative cinema to the Bow Valley the first Monday of every month, with engaging feature-length films and creative Canadian shorts.

Reel Time Film Series - Fall 2014 - On sale now

Mondays - October 6, November 3, December 1
Lux Cinema - Wolf & Bear Mall, 229 Bear Street
All tickets $12 | Fall 3 Pack (all 3 films) $24
Call the Box Office at 403-762-6301 to reserve, cash only at the door (subject to availability)

BOYHOOD

Monday, October 6, 2014 - 7:00 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear St

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Boyhood, the new film from Richard Linklater chronicles twelve years in the life of Texas tyke Mason (Ellar Coltrane), his sister (Lorelei Linklater), and his troubled parents (Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette). Already singled out as one of the major American films of the year, it is the pinnacle of the uniquely collaborative approach the director has made his own. Filmed intermittently from 2002 to 2013, with the cast aging along with their characters, Boyhood is the definitive coming-of-age film and was a critical smash at this year's Sundance.

Director: Richard Linklater
Language: English
Running Time: 165 mins
Rated: 14A

 
 

TRACKS

Monday, November 3, 2014 - 7:00 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear St

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

In 1977, a twenty-seven-year-old Australian woman named Robyn Davidson set out from Alice Springs to walk 2,700 kilometres of harsh desert to the Indian Ocean. Accompanied only by her dog and four camels, Davidson yearned for a solitary journey of self-discovery, and had no ambition other than to reach the ocean. She ultimately wrote about her desert adventure in her 1980 book Tracks, which became a cult favourite around the world and has now been beautifully adapted for the big screen by director John Curran (The Painted Veil, We Don't Live Here Anymore).

Director: : John Curran
Language: English
Running Time: 112 mins
Rated: PG

 
 

THE LUNCHBOX

Monday, December 1, 2014 - 7:00 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear St

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Irrfan Khan (Life of Pi, Slumdog Millionaire) stars alongside the radiant Nimrat Kaur in Ritesh Batra's delightful feature debut, in which a mistaken lunchbox delivery paves the way for an unlikely romance. In Mumbai, home to over 18 million people, more than 5,000 famously efficient dabbawallas - lunchbox couriers - navigate chaotic streets to deliver lunches, lovingly prepared by housewives, to working men across the city. Ila (Kaur) is a housewife living in a middle- class neighbourhood with a husband who ignores her. Saajan (Khan) is a beaten down widower about to retire from his number-crunching job. After Ila realizes that Saajan is receiving the meals meant for her husband, the two begin sending each other letters through the lunchbox. What starts as an innocent exchange about Ila's cooking gently develops into something more. Outside the space of their daily lives, both Ila and Saajan feel free to express themselves in new ways, leading them both to question how they might find happiness. Batra'sThe Lunchbox paints a nuanced portrait of life in contemporary Mumbai, effortlessly weaving themes of gender values, social class, and generational differences into its core love story. Batra's beautifully penned characters - including Aslam (Nawazuddin Siddiqui), the eager trainee preparing to take over Saajan's job - and gentle, precise direction simply envelope you. Whether it's the cooking of a meal, the reading of a letter, or the riding of a crowded train, the film's small moments culminate in big impact. In a word: enchanting.

Director: : Ritesh Batra
Language: Hindi with English subtitles
Running Time: 104 mins
Rated: PG

 
 
 

Previous Season's Screenings

Winter 2014

Wadjda

Saudi Arabia's first-ever submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award, Haifaa Al-Mansour's Wadjda—which is not only the country's first film by a female director, but one of the first features ever shot in Saudi Arabia—is a deceptively simple story about a determined 10-year-old girl who dreams of owning a bicycle, and is willing to do just about anything to obtain it. An energetic, fun-loving, and entrepreneurial girl living in a suburb of the Saudi capital of Riyadh, Wadjda (newcomer Waad Mohammed) constantly pushes against the boundaries of her conservative community, wearing high-top Converse sneakers under the long-robed abaya uniform forced upon her by her strict religious school, and clandestinely listening to underground pop-music stations in her equally strict home. After a fight with her friend Abdullah, Wadjda sees a beautiful green bicycle for sale and becomes determined to buy it in order to beat Abdullah in a race. However, Wadjda's mother (Reem Abdullah), fearing repercussions from a society that sees bicycles as dangerous to a girl's virtue, forbids her. Undeterred, Wadjda decides to try and raise the required 800 riyals herself by entering a Qur'an contest that offers a cash prize.

Director: Haifaa Al-Mansour
Language: Arabic with English subtitles
Running Time: 96 mins
Rated: PG

 
 

Inside Llewyn Davis

Winner of the Grand Prix at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, Inside Llewyn Davis recounts a desolate week in the life of a fictional folk musician in early 1960s New York. Brilliantly written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen (O Brother Where Art Thou? The Big Lebowski), the film is a humorous, heartfelt, and bittersweet ode to squandered opportunities, thwarted ambition, and unsung genius. A gorgeous opening scene in Greenwich Village's Gaslight Café introduces us to Llewyn Davis (a delightfully rumpled and bearded Oscar Isaac; Drive, W.E.) as he sings a bleak but beautiful song called "Hang Me, Oh Hang Me." Llewyn has been attempting a solo career, having just split from his performing partner, but despite his extraordinary talent and good looks, he just can't seem to catch a break. Desperately low on money, he tramps the cold streets of New York, guitar in hand, playing only the tiniest of gigs. He is essentially living a transient existence, bouncing from apartment to apartment and crashing on the couches of anyone who will have him—and some who won't. With his music career stalled, Llewyn has reached a personal crossroads and is unsure whether to continue in a world that doesn't seem ready for what his songs have to say.

Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Language: English
Running Time: 105 mins
Rated: 14A

 
 

Gabrielle

Canada's official submission for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2014 Academy Awards, and produced by the team behind the Oscar nominated Incendies and Monsieur Lazhar, Louise Archambault's Gabrielle is a stunning, tender film about a developmentally challenged young woman's quest for independence and sexual freedom. Living in a group home, musically talented Gabrielle (Gabrielle Marion-Rivard) has found love with Martin (Alexandre Landry), a fellow member of her choir. They want to explore their feelings for one another physically, but are not allowed. Convinced that living alone will allow her to have the intimate relationship she so desperately craves, Gabrielle tries valiantly to prove she can be independent.

Director: Louise Archambault
Language: French with English subtitles
Running Time: 104 mins
Rated: 14A

 
 

Finding Vivian Maier

This intriguing documentary shuttles from New York to France to Chicago as it traces the life story of the late Vivian Maier, a career nanny who has earned a posthumous reputation as one of America's most accomplished and insightful street photographers. When Maier died in 2009 at age 83, she left behind more than 100,000 negatives—images that she'd scarcely shared with anyone. She had spent most of her adult life as a child-care worker with no spouse, no children of her own, and no close ties. Her photographs and belongings were hidden in storage, until the rent came overdue and the facility auctioned them off. They might have vanished into obscurity were it not for the intervention of John Maloof, a 26-year old amateur historian who purchased a box of Maier's unidentified photographs and became obsessed by what he discovered. In Finding Vivian Maier, Maloof teams with producer Charlie Siskel to uncover this mystery. Following clues, they trace Maier's history through New York City, France, and Chicago. An inveterate wanderer and self-taught photographer, touring the world with her Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex camera, Maier had an uncanny ability to get close to people from all walks of life.

Director: John Maloof, Charlie Siskel
Language: English
Running Time: 83 mins

Fall 2013

Kon-Tiki

Monday, October 7, 2013 - 7:00 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear St

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Kon-Tiki is a 2012 Norwegian historical drama film directed by Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg about the 1947 Kon-Tiki expedition. The role of Thor Heyerdahl is played by Pål Sverre Valheim Hagen.

 

Fruitvale Station

Monday, November 4, 2013 - 7:00 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear St

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Fruitvale Station (originally titled Fruitvale) is a 2013 American drama film written and directed by Ryan Coogler. It is Coogler's first feature-length film and is based on the true story of Oscar Grant, a young man who was killed by BART police officer Johannes Mehserle at the Fruitvale Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Station in Oakland, California.
The film stars Michael B. Jordan as Oscar Grant. Forest Whitaker is one of the film's producers. Kevin Durand and Chad Michael Murray play the two BART police officers involved in Grant's death. The names of the officers were changed for the film. Fruitvale Station debuted at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award for U.S. dramatic film. It was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where it won the award for Best First Film. The film was released in theatres July 12, 2013.

 

20 Feet From Stardom

Monday, December 2, 2013 - 7:00 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear St

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

20 Feet From Stardom is a 2013 American documentary film directed by veteran documentary filmmaker Morgan Neville and was produced by Gil Friesen, a music industry executive whose curiosity to know more about the lives of the background singers inspired the making of the film.
The film follows the behind-the-scenes of backup singers and stars Darlene Love, Judith Hill, Merry Clayton, Lisa Fischer, Táta Vega, and Jo Lawry, among many others.

Winter 2013

The Sessions

Monday, January 7, 2013, 7 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

The Sessions

Director: Ben Lewin
Language: English
Based on the poignantly optimistic autobiographical writings of the late California-based journalist and poet Mark O'Brien, The Sessions recounts the funny and touching story of a man who lived permanently confined to an iron lung and who is determined - at age 38, and with the help of his therapist and the guidance of his priest - to lose his virginity. Featuring outstanding performances from a first-rate cast, including Academy Award-winner Helen Hunt and Academy Award nominees John Hawkes and William H. Macy, The Sessions is a warm, heartfelt study in generosity and desire, a rare film that acknowledges the erotic lives of people with disabilities. Sensual but never lewd, this is one of the year's most authentic and unlikely feel-good films.
 

 

Inch' Allah

Monday, February 4, 2013, 7 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Inch’ Allah

Director: Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette
Language: French, English, Arabic, Hebrew
From the producers of the Academy Award-nominated Incendies and Monsieur Lazhar comes Inch' Allah, an intense, politically charged drama that explores the impact and ramifications of Israel's separation barrier on the divided populations of the West Bank.

Chloé is a young Canadian doctor working in a West Bank refugee camp, where she monitors the pregnancies of young Palestinian patients under the supervision of Michaël, a French obstetrician. Between checkpoints and stray bullets, Chloé learns about war, and those who bear its burden: Rand, pregnant with her first child; her eldest brother Faysal, a passionate member of the Palestinian resistance with whom Chloé falls in love; their younger brother Safi, who dreams of leaving Palestine; and Ava, the young Israeli soldier who lives upstairs from Chloé in Jerusalem. Torn between the two sides of the conflict, wrapped up in the absurdity of the struggle, Chloé tries as best she can to build bridges until the conflict draws her, too, into its cycle of violence.

Director Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette approaches this charged material with remarkable maturity and skill which cleverly shows how Chloé's relative freedom of movement offers her a unique overview of the dilemma while highlighting her status as an outsider.

 

Amour

Monday, March 4, 2013, 7 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Headhunters

Director: Michael Haneke
Language: French
Drawing on the extraordinary talents of two of the finest and most legendary performers in the history of French cinema - Jean-Louis Trintignant (The Conformist, Trois couleurs: Rouge) and Emmanuelle Riva (Hiroshima mon amour) — the Palme d'Or-winning Amour details the painful dilemma that confronts Anne and Georges Laurent, a married couple in their eighties encountering the indignities of ageing and the end of life. Ensconced in an apartment that fits them like an old glove, settled happily into their long-established domestic routines, their world is upended when Anne suddenly displays symptoms of a stroke. With Anne now partially paralyzed, Georges struggles to care for her at home, with each day bringing new, ever more painful challenges.

Director Michael Haneke's script is a masterpiece of compassion and understanding which unerringly touches all the right notes, and skillfully avoids sentimentality, cliché, and bathos. Full of surprises, this is a magisterial work from a brilliant artist who powerfully and intelligently describes the relationship of a couple facing their own mortality.

 

The Sapphires

Monday, April 8, 2013, 7 p.m.

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

$12 | Subscriber $10

Headhunters

Director: Wayne Blair
Language: English
1968 was the year the planet went haywire. All around the globe, there were riots and revolution in the streets. There were hard drugs, soft drugs, free love and psychedelic music. There was the shock of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy's assassinations. And dominating every other news story... There was Vietnam.


For four young women from a remote Aboriginal mission, 1968 was the year that changed their lives forever. Sisters Gail, Julie and Cynthia, together with their cousin Kay, are discovered by Dave, a down-on-his-luck Irish musician with attitude, a taste for Irish whiskey, and an ear for Soul Music. Dave steers the girls away from their Country & Western origins then flies them to the war-zones of South Vietnam, where they sing Soul Classics for the American Marines. On tour in the Mekong Delta, the girls sing up a storm, dodge bullets... And fall in love.


Inspired by a true story, The Sapphires is a triumphant celebration of youth, courage, love, family and Soul Music.

Winter 2012

Monday, January 9 – 7 p.m.

Take Shelter

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street, Banff, $12; Four-pack $36
Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Take Shelter

Director: Jeff Nichols
Language: English
Curtis LaForche (Michael Shannon) is unraveling. A devoted family man living in an Ohio small town, he’s plagued by disturbing dreams and apocalyptic visions, increasingly unable to determine what’s real and what’s imaginary. Provoked by his own sense of impending disaster, he begins to bulk up the family’s backyard storm shelter, putting everything in his life in jeopardy. Director Jeff Nichols (Shotgun Stories) makes smart use of the flat, Midwestern landscape, and the happy ordinariness of Curtis’s family, to offset the black clouds moving in. Oscar nominee Shannon (Revolutionary Road) stars with Jessica Chastain (The Tree of Life, The Help) in this powerful metaphor for the growing unease in American life.

 

Monday, February 6 – 7 p.m.

Monsieur Lazhar

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street, Banff, $12; Four-pack $36
Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Monsieur Lazhar

Director: Philippe Falardeau
Language: French with English subtitles
Produced by the team that brought Incendies to the screen last year, this Quebecois film by director Philippe Falardeau is a funny, authentic story about what we say when we talk to each other about death. Algerian political refugee Bashir Lazhar (Mohamed Fellag) contacts a Montreal elementary school when he reads in the newspaper that one of their teachers has committed suicide at the school. Desperate for work, he offers to fill in in the classroom, and the overwhelmed principal agrees. The story focuses on Lazhar’s struggle with the often-absurd Quebec education system, and his connection with two of the students, former friends who have been deeply affected by their teacher’s death. Monsieur Lazhar is Canada’s Best Foreign Film entry for the 2011 Academy Awards.

 

Monday, March 5 – 7 p.m.

Le Havre

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street, Banff, $12; Four-pack $36
Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Le Havre

Language: French with English subtitles
Finnish auteur Aki Kaurismäki returns with this politically-charged fairy tale. The life of self-taught intellectual and shoeshiner Marcel Marx (André Wilms) has an unexpected twist of fate when he discovers African refugee Idrissa (Blondin Miguel) who has just emerged from a cargo ship container in the industrial French port city of Le Havre. It’s a stylized character study that moves back and forth between deadpan dark humour and the comfortable, comic charms of classic cinema. Idrissa is absorbed into Marcel’s working-class community, pursued by a police detective, and Marcel must figure out how to get the boy across the channel to England, where the rest of his family has gone.

 

Monday, April 2 – 7 p.m.

Pina

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street, Banff, $12; Four-pack $36
Call The Banff Centre Box Office at 403-762-6301

Pina

Language: German, Russian, Italian, French, Slovenian, Korean, Spanish, and Portuguese with English subtitles
Wim Wenders’s Oscar-nominated documentary on German experimental choreographer Pina Bausch has been called revolutionary, an exploration of dance, theatre, and life. Artistic director of Berlin’s Tanztheatre Wuppertal, Bausch was a towering figure in contemporary dance, mixing a wildly inventive approach to staging with elaborate, often surreal sets, and eclectic music. Wenders’s film, which he had to rethink after Bausch unexpectedly died of cancer days before shooting began, is an immersive experience of intense creativity, and the deep connections between dancers and choreographer. “Every sequence showcases Bausch’s gift for stripping the human experience down to form,” says the Ottawa Citizen. “Movement and the concrete manifestations of emotion. The effect isn’t just jaw-dropping, it’s spiritually inspiring.

Fall 2011

Monday, October 3 – 7 p.m.

The Tree of Life

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Brad Pitt, Tree of Life

Directed by Terrence Malick (Days of Heaven, The Thin Red Line), The Tree of Life follows one man from boyhood, delving into intimate and cosmic questions. Growing up in Texas in the 1950s, Jack (played as an adult by Sean Penn) grows into a discontented man. He’s struggling to reconcile his complicated relationship with his father (Brad Pitt), questioning the existence of faith, and imagining the origin and meaning of life. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.

 

Monday, November 7 – 7 p.m.

Oranges and Sunshine

Max Bell Auditorium

Oranges and Sunshine

Based on true historical events, Oranges and Sunshine tells the story of Margaret Humphreys (Emily Watson), a British social worker who discovered the mass forced migration of 130,000 poor children to Australia in the mid-20th century. A secret that the British government kept hidden for years, it led Humphreys to uncover the truth, and reunite hundreds of children with their parents.

 

Monday, December 5 – 7 p.m.

The First Grader

Max Bell Auditorium

The First Grader

This is the true story of Maruge (Oliver Litondo), a former Mau Mau freedom fighter, now in his 80s, living in rural Kenya. Hearing that the Kenyan government has offered an opportunity for free primary school education to the country’s children, Maruge shows up at the local school, where he meets head teacher Jane Obinchu (Naomie Harris). Against the opposition of parents, other teachers, and government officials, Maruge enters a classroom for the first time in his life.

Winter 2010

January 10, 7 p.m.

Mao’s Last Dancer

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Mao’s Last Dancer

From internationally acclaimed Australian film director Bruce Beresford comes the inspirational true story of a small boy’s extraordinary journey from poverty to international stardom. Mao’s Last Dancer captures the intoxicating effects of first love and celebrity, the pain of exile, and ultimately the triumph of individual endeavour over ideology. Filmed in China, the US, and Australia and with a brilliant performance from Chi Cao as Li Cunxin, Mao’s Last Dancer is an exhilarating exploration of what it means to be free.

 

February 7, 7 p.m.

Incendies

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Incendies

To encounter a film of heart-wrenching tragedy, mythic proportions, and sweeping visual majesty is rare, but such are the riches of Denis Villeneuve’s Incendies. After last year’s multiple Genie Award-winning Polytechnique, Villeneuve continues his acute examination of women in devastating situations facing complex and harrowing circumstances.

 

March 7, 7 p.m.

Another Year

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Another Year

Another Year is a deeply absorbing look at a couple who seem to have gotten it right and a bunch of people who haven’t, and a son who could go either way! In this wry and affectionate character study of a mostly middle-aged group of people, director Mike Leigh’s grip on the material is unfailingly confident and his actors all deliver highly charged and beautifully shaded performances.  

 

April 4, 7 p.m.

The Illusionist

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

The Illusionist

Following on the heels of his brilliant 2003 hit, Les Triplettes de Belleville, director Sylvain Chomet returns to the Festival with The Illusionist, another beautifully drawn and poignant work of animation. Based on an unproduced script by Jacques Tati, the film follows forlorn and timeworn Tatischeff, a shabby but dignified magician trying to find an audience in a world of 50s rock and roll and consumerism.

— Screenings from Fall 2010 —

October 4, 7 p.m.

I Am Love

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

I Am Love

In I Am Love, an aristocratic Italian family gathers to celebrate the birthday party of the family patriarch. However, the estate’s cool, cultivated ritual is disturbed by the visit of a young man who becomes a central character in the family drama. In a cast headed by Tilda Swinton, sexual and class politics play a key role as controlled moments of passion and emotion suddenly break the placid surface of the Recchi family.

 

November 1, 7 p.m.

Winter’s Bone

Lux Cinema, 229 Bear Street

Winter’s Bone, 2010

Ree Dolly is a resourceful, resilient 17-year-old living with her broken-down family deep in the Ozark Mountains. When her meth-making father disappears, the family home is threatened, and in an epic quest that takes her from adolescence to adulthood, Ree crosses their bleak, impoverished county in search of him. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival, Winter’s Bone features a break-out performance by newcomer Jennifer Lawrence.

 

December 6, 7 p.m.

The Secret in Their Eyes

Margaret Greenham Theatre, The Banff Centre

The Secret in Their Eyes, 2009

A newly retired criminal investigator is writing a novel about a real cold case from 1974 – the murder of a young woman in her own apartment. As he searches for new clues, he’s drawn into a tense game that pits past against present and colleagues against suspects. The Secret in Their Eyes, a sleek, suspenseful Argentinean film noir, won the 2009 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.  



Reel Time is sponsored by:

Film Circuit   Avalance Movie Co
Avalance Movie Co
Avalance Movie Co