Corb Lund: Banff Springs Hospital Fundraiser

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Corb lund wearing a formal denim shirt and white Stetson hat sits in front of a heavily stickered wall.

Photo by Denise DeBelius.

Covenant Health's Banff Mineral Springs Hospital Fundraiser featuring Corb Lund.

Lund has been named roots Artist of the Year by the Canadian Country Music Association five years in a row.  He has picked up JUNO awards, and countless CCMA and WCMA award nominations.  He has also been nominated in the U.S for an “Americana” award in 2010. Lund came by all the praise naturally: Unlike many so-called "country artists" these days, he is no drugstore cowboy – he’s the real McCoy. "My family is all ranchers and rodeo people," Lund says. "They’ve been in Canada for about 100 years, and before that they were raising cattle in Utah and Nevada. Some of my relatives are still down there. I grew up rodeoing. I was a steer rider – that’s like the junior version of bull riding. I was on horseback pretty much as soon as I could walk."

See this genuine country artist at Banff Centre as he plays in support of a great cause.







Artist Biography

Corb Lund

Lund has been named Roots Artist of the Year by the Canadian Country Music Association five years in a row.  He has picked up JUNO awards, and countless CCMA and WCMA award nominations.  He has also been nominated in the U.S for an “Americana” award in 2010. 

Lund came by all the praise naturally: Unlike many so-called "country artists" these days, he is no drugstore cowboy – he’s the real McCoy. "My family is all ranchers and rodeo people," Lund says. "They’ve been in Canada for about 100 years, and before that they were raising cattle in Utah and Nevada. Some of my relatives are still down there. I grew up rodeoing. I was a steer rider – that’s like the junior version of bull riding. I was on horseback pretty much as soon as I could walk."

Lund’s interest in musical storytelling was bred by his boyhood love of Marty Robbins (whose classic 1959 LP Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs was a crucial discovery) and Johnny Horton (whose hits like "The Battle of New Orleans" and "North to Alaska" impressed the budding history buff). Lund acknowledges the impact of other performers – Kris Kristofferson (now a New West label mate), Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. But some even more important influences ran in the family.

"My grandpas used to sing all these old Western cowboy ballads," Lund says. "Those songs come from before recorded music -- they’re traditional numbers that the cowboys always sing in camp, or just for fun, to entertain themselves. My grandpas knew all those songs. The first song I ever knew was called ‘The Strawberry Roan,’ a cowboy song that’s at least 150 years old."

Country and Western music has always run in Lund’s blood, but before he began performing it full-time, he was swept away by indie rock. From 1989 to 2001, he worked with the aggressive Edmonton band the Smalls.